Intel Celeron P6


Intel Celeron © Intel
Intel Celeron © Intel

Introduced in April 1998, the first Celeron branded CPU was based on the Pentium II branded core. As a product concept, the Celeron was introduced in response to Intel's loss of the low-end market, in particular to the Cyrix 6x86, the AMD K6, and the IDT WinChip. Intel's existing low-end product, the Pentium MMX, was no longer performance competitive at 233 MHz. Although a faster Pentium MMX would have been a lower-risk strategy, the industry standard Socket 7 platform hosted a market of competitor CPUs which could be drop-in replacements for the Pentium MMX. Instead, Intel pursued a budget part that was pin-compatible with their high-end Pentium II product, using the Pentium II's Slot 1 interface.

 

The Celeron Covington (1998)

The first Covington Celeron was essentially a 266 MHz Pentium II manufactured without any secondary cache at all. Covington also shared the 80523 product code of Deschutes. Although clocked at 266 or 300 MHz, the cacheless Celerons were a good deal slower than the parts they were designed to replace. Substantial numbers were sold on first release, largely on the strength of the Intel name, but the Celeron quickly achieved a poor reputation both in the trade press and among computer professionals. The initial market interest faded rapidly in the face of its poor performance and with sales at a very low level, Intel felt obliged to develop a substantially faster replacement as soon as possible. Nevertheless the first Celerons were quite popular among some overclockers, for their flexible overclockability and reasonable price. Covington was only manufactured in Slot 1 SEPP format.

Intel Celeron 300 MHz

CPU-Z:


BX80523R300000
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The Celeron Mendocino (1998)

The Mendocino Celeron, launched 24 August 1998, was the first retail CPU to use on-die L2 cache. Whereas Covington had no secondary cache at all, Mendocino included 128 KB of L2 cache running at full clock rate. The first Mendocino-core Celeron was clocked at a then-modest 300 MHz but offered almost twice the performance of the old cacheless Covington Celeron at the same clock rate. To distinguish it from the older Covington 300 MHz, Intel called the Mendocino core Celeron 300A. Although the other Mendocino Celerons (the 333 MHz part, for example) did not have an A appended, some people call all Mendocino processors Celeron-A regardless of clock rate.

Intel Celeron 333 MHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

FV80524RX333
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Intel Celeron 366 MHz

CPU-Z:


Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

B80524P366
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FV80524RX366
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Intel Celeron 400 MHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi (Slot 1 CPU).

80524RX400
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FV80524RX400
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Intel Celeron 433 MHz

CPU-Z:


80524RX433
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FV80524RX433
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Intel Celeron 466 MHz

FV524RX466
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Intel Celeron 500 MHz

FV80524RX500
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Intel Celeron 533 MHz

CPU-Z:


FV80524RX533
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The Celeron Coppermine (2000)

The next generation Celeron was the 'Coppermine-128' (sometimes known as the Celeron II). These were a derivative of Intel's Coppermine Pentium III and were released on 29 March 2000. Like the Mendocino, the Celeron-128 used 128 KB of on-chip L2 cache and was (initially) restricted to a 66 MHz Front Side Bus Speed, But the big news was the addition of SSE instructions, due to the new Coppermine core. Besides only having half the L2 cache (128 KB instead of 256 KB) and the lower FSB (66-100 MHz instead of 100-133 MHz), the Coppermine Celeron was identical to the Coppermine Pentium III.

Intel Celeron 533A MHz

533A MHz
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Intel Celeron 566 MHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

Intel Celeron 600 MHz

CPU-Z:


600 MHz
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Intel Celeron 700 MHz

700 MHz
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Intel Celeron 800 MHz

800 MHz
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Intel Celeron 850 MHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

850 MHz
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Intel Celeron 900 MHz

900 MHz
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Intel Celeron 1000 MHz

1000 MHz
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Intel Celeron 1100 MHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

1100 MHz
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The Celeron Tualatin (2001)

These Celeron processors, released initially at 1.2 GHz on 2 October 2001, were based on the Pentium III 'Tualatin' core and made with a 0.13 micrometer process for the FCPGA 2 socket 370. Intel later released 1 GHz and 1.1 GHz parts. A 1.3 GHz chip, launched 4 January 2002, and finally a 1.4 GHz chip, launched 15 May 2002 (the same day as the 1.7 GHz Willamette-based Celeron launch), marked the end of the Tualatin-256 line.

Intel Celeron 1300 MHz

1300 MHz
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The Mobile Celeron

Microsoft's Xbox game console uses a variant of the Pentium III/Mobile Celeron family in a Micro-PGA2 form factor. The sSpec designator of the chips is SL5Sx, which makes it most similar to the Mobile Celeron Coppermine-128 processor. It shares with the Coppermine-128 Celeron its 133 MT/s front side bus, 128 KB L2 cache, and 180 nm process technology.

Intel Mobile Celeron 733 MHz - The XBOX CPU

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

733 MHz
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Unlisted models:

 

  • Covington: 266 MHz
  • Mendocino, SECC: 300 MHz, 333 MHz, 366 MHz
  • Mendocino, PPGA: 300 MHz
  • Coppermine-128, FSB66: 633 MHz, 666 MHz, 733 MHz, 766 MHz
  • Coppermine-128, FSB100: 950 MHz
  • Tualatin-256: 900 MHz, 1000 MHz, 1100 MHz, 1200 MHz, 1400 MHz

 

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