Intel Core i Family

Core 2 ◄ Core i


Including Intel Core i3, i5, i7, i7 Extreme, Xeon, Pentium and Celeron

Intel Core i5 © Intel
Intel Core i5 © Intel

The Intel Core i series are x86 CPUs by Intel that succeeded the Core 2 family from 2008.

Nehalem

Nehalem is the codename for an Intel processor microarchitecture, successor to the Core microarchitecture. Nehalem processors use the 45 nm process. A preview system with two Nehalem processors was shown at Intel Developer Forum in 2007. The first processor released with the Nehalem architecture was the desktop Core i7, which was released in November 2008.

Intel Xeon E5502 (Nehalem-EP)

Xeon E5502
Specification Details
Show


Intel Xeon X5650 (Nehalem-EP)

Xeon X5650
Specification Details
Show


Intel Xeon MP L7545 (Beckton)

Xeon MP L7545
Specification Details
Show


Westmere

Westmere (formerly Nehalem-C) is the name given to the 32 nm die shrink of Nehalem. The first Westmere-based processors were launched on January 7, 2010 by Intel.

Intel Core i3-350M

i3-350M
Specification Details
Show


Sandy Bridge

Sandy Bridge is the codename for a microarchitecture developed by Intel beginning in 2005 for central processing units in computers to replace the Nehalem microarchitecture. Intel demonstrated a Sandy Bridge processor in 2009, and released first products based on the architecture in January 2011 under the Core brand.

Intel Core i3-2100

i3-2100
Specification Details
Show


Intel Core i5-2400

CPU-Z:


i5-2400
Specification Details
Show


Intel Celeron G550

CPU-Z:


G550
Specification Details
Show


Intel Core i5-2520M

i5-2520M
Specification Details
Show


Intel Mobile Celeron B815

B815
Specification Details
Show


Haswell

Haswell is the codename for a processor microarchitecture developed by Intel as the successor to the Ivy Bridge architecture. It uses a 22 nm process. Intel officially announced CPUs with this microarchitecture on June 4, 2013 at Computex Taipei 2013.

Intel Core i5-4570

CPU-Z:


i5-4570
Specification Details
Show


Sumbit a picture or contribute to the museum!

Please note that modern processors have more value as the processor itself than a collectible value.

RETURN TO INTEL

RETURN TO THE MAIN MUSEUM PAGE