Intel Xeon (Net-Burst)

Pentium III Xeon ◄ Xeon (Net-Burst) ► Xeon (Core)


The Intel Xeon series based on the Netburst microarchitecture is a family of x86 compatible microprocessors designed for server and workstations. 

With the Netburst Xeon, Intel introduced the suffixes DP and MP. DP stands for dual-processoring, MP stands for multi-processoring.

Intel Xeon Foster

In mid-2001, the Xeon brand was introduced ("Pentium" was dropped from the name). The initial variant that used the new NetBurst microarchitecture, "Foster", was slightly different from the desktop Pentium 4 ("Willamette"). It was a decent chip for workstations, but for server applications it was almost always outperformed by the older Cascades cores with a 2 MB L2 cache and AMD's Athlon MP. Combined with the need to use expensive Rambus Dynamic RAM, the Foster's sales were somewhat unimpressive.

Intel Xeon 1.7 GHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

1.7 GHz
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The Xeon Prestonia

In 2002 Intel released a 130 nm version of Xeon branded CPU, codenamed "Prestonia". It supported Intel's new Hyper-Threading technology and had a 512 kB L2 cache. This was based on the "Northwood" Pentium 4 core. The Prestonia performed much better than its predecessor and noticeably better than Athlon MP. The support of new features in the E75xx series also gave it a key advantage over the Pentium III Xeon and Athlon MP branded CPUs (both stuck with rather old chipsets), and it quickly became the top-selling server/workstation processor.

Intel Xeon 1.8 GHz

1.8 GHz
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Intel Xeon 2 GHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

2 GHz
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Intel Xeon 2.2 GHz

2.2 GHz
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Intel Xeon 2.4 GHz

2.4 GHz
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Intel Xeon 2.8 GHz

Kindly donated by Pauli Rautakorpi.

2.8 GHz
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The Xeon Nocona

Due to a lack of success with Intel's Itanium and Itanium 2 processors, AMD was able to introduce x86-64, a 64-bit extension to the x86 architecture. Intel followed suit by including Intel 64 (formerly EM64T; it is almost identical to AMD64) in the 90 nm version of the Pentium 4 ("Prescott"), and a Xeon version codenamed "Nocona" with 1 MB L2 cache was released in 2004. The Xeon was noticeably slower than AMD's Opteron, although it could be faster in situations where Hyper-Threading came into play.

Intel Xeon 2.8 GHz

2.8 GHz
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Intel Xeon 3.0 GHz

3.0 GHz
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Intel Xeon 3.4 GHz

3.4 GHz
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The Xeon Irwindale

A slightly updated core called "Irwindale" was released in early 2005, with 2 MB L2 cache and the ability to have its clock speed reduced during low processor demand. Although it was a bit more competitive than the Nocona had been, independent tests showed that AMD's Opteron still outperformed Irwindale. Both of these Prescott-derived Xeons have the product code 80546.

Intel Xeon 2.8 GHz

2.8 GHz
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Intel Xeon 3 GHz

3 GHz
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Intel Xeon 3.2 GHz

3.2 GHz
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Intel Xeon 3.8 GHz

3.8 GHz
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The Xeon (MP) Tulsa

Released on 29 August 2006, the 7100 series, codenamed Tulsa (product code 80550), is an improved version of Paxville MP, built on a 65 nm process, with 2 MB of L2 cache (1 MB per core) and up to 16 MB of L3 cache. It uses Socket 604.

Intel Xeon MP 7120N

MP 7120N
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